Tag Archives: Journalism

MediaGuardian hacks now write for paidContent

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Cross promotion is inevitable when one content site buys another, but it gets a little complicated when the publisher of a big content buys another smaller content site which covers the same sector – and decides to keep the smaller one going as a standalone entity.

Such is the case with the paidContent site and its recent acquisition by the Guardian. The mainstream media owner has wasted no time at all in pulling paidContent, er, content, into the MediaGuardian’s own digital news pages. Not sure how this impacted the existing digital news team there, namely Jemima Kiss, but hey, who are we to second guess one of the most successful publishers in the UK?

But integration and cross promotional thingies have increased even more with today’s inclusion of a post from the MediaGuardian’s own PDA digital news blog on paidContent’s site. Not sure if the byline format works for me, but it’s interesting how this is slowly developing into something interesting. Assuming this is step two in a defined long term game plan.

Separately, the paidContent blog talks about a new website by the creators of Dazed & Confused called Dazed Digital. Not a magazine extension site it appears, but a destination in its own right. Quite nice, but no obvious sign of comments or UGC services for us fickle read/write/rip consumers of content. Also, most of the videos seem to suffer from poor lighting, making each interviewee look like they’re in silhouette. Artistic fancy or handycam hitch?

How to become a journalist: act like one

Every time someone asks me how IĀ got into journalism, I usually trot out the same words of advice: write, submit, write, submit, write…you get the picture.

My point being that no matter what your qualifications or experience, if you write an article and the editor you submit it to likes what he or she reads, then you’re in.

Formal qualifications do matter in some lines of specialist reporting (ie having a science degree clearly helps when writing for New Scientist). But if you have a talent for writing must read copy, then you’re most of the way there.

Students I speak to tend to stuck on the ‘submit’ bit of my ‘write, submit’ mantra. Pre-2000, I always recommended emailing, posting or faxing (remember that?) content in to editors for consideration. Since 2000, I’ve added forum posting and blogging to the list.

The power of how contributing to blogs alone can boost your career prospects in journalism is emphasised by people like Cath Elliott, who was first ‘talent spotted’ on the Guardian’s Comment is Free portal as a commenter. According to the Guardian, her comments has such insight and thoughtfulness that she was invited to become a contributor.

Of course, some may argue that Cath isn’t a journalist but a blogger. But what is a journalist these days? Two things might sway this debate: a) the blog platform is owned by a major national newspaper and b) at any time, her content has the potential to make it into the print newspaper or ‘official’ Guardian news site. So – is Cath a journalist?

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Networked journalism – the viable face of citizen journalism

Citizen journalism websites can’t survive according to a post by journalism.co.uk’s John Ndege, the founder of start-up ScribbleSheet.

Instead, Networked Journalism sites which integrate users into their professional set up have more than a fighting chance. Why? Because they provide the collaborative appeal of CJ websites, while retaining the quality of professional publications. Read more about Networked Journalism at Buzzmachine.

Read John’s full post on journalism.co.uk

Virgin Atlantic runs press trips for bloggers

Paul Charles, comms director of Virgin Atlantic says PR professionals shoudl treat bloggers and online writers the same as print journalists.

Talking to PR Week, he said, ‘The bloggers we ahve approached are delighted that they are being taken seriously.’

I bet they are.

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Newspapers ignoring young audiences says report

“Younger age groups may never acquire the ‘paid-for newspaper habit’,” says a readership trends report Ernst & Young. “Publishers will have to find other means of attracting their attention.”

But the research, as reported in the MediaGuardian says CD giveaways aren’t the way to do it as they fail to address the fact that more than half of the UK’s 15 to 44-year-olds use the internet for their daily information, most of which is free.

So – will more newspapers really have to adopt the freesheet model in years to come to attract younger readers? If so, I dread to think what shoe-string budgets are going to do to the already declining quality of UK newspapers.

Full Guardian story

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